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Hermle Clocks: Operational Manuals

How to set up and operate Hermle Grandfather / Floor Clocks. Downloadable Instructions.

You can see the pdf file with instructions HERE 

Setting up and adjusting Hermle Mantel, Table and Wall clocks. Downloadable Instructions.

Please click the PDF icon to download the pdf file with instructions. 

Instructions on how to set up your Hermle Tellurium Clock. Downloadable Instructions. 

You can find a pdf file with an operating manual for Hermle Tellurium Clocks HERE.

Hermle Ship Bell Clock Manual. Downloadable Instructions.

Click HERE to download a PDF file with instructions on how to set up and operate your ship clock. 

Hermle 8-Day Weight Driven Wall Clock Operating Manual. Downloadable Instructions

You can find a downloadable instructions for Hermle 8-Day Weight Driven Wall Clock here

Hermle Quartz Clocks Operating Manual. Downloadable Instructions

You can find a PDF file with the Quartz clock instructions HERE

Hermle Striking Mantel Clock Instructions

 

Operating Instructions for Hermle Mechanical Mantel and Table clocks with Hour and Half Hour Strike 

note: These clocks have a blance wheel and Hermle 130 Series Movement

  • Take the clock and key carefully out of the carton.
  • Carefully remove the protective packaging such as foam rubber, corrugated paper, rubber bands, etc. You will find these mainly where the hammers, gongs or bells are located, inside the back of the clock. Open front door and remove the plastic safety bushing. Save the packing in case the clock needs to be returned.
  • Please wind your clock fully every 7 days for optimum performance (the clock will actually run about 8 - 9 days on one winding). To wind the clock use the enclosed key. Turn key clockwise until it stops. The left winder is for the striking and the right winder is for the time.
  • If striking is not required, do not wind up the left winding square (some models have a strike shutoff lever located inside the back of the clock).
  • Move the minute hand (long hand) clockwise or counterclockwise to set the clock to the correct time. The clock will strike the number of each hour, and will strike once on the half-hour.
  • If the clock is striking the wrong hour, move the hour hand (short hand) to point to the hour that the clock just struck.
  • To make the clock go slower or faster, turn the regulating screw that is shown in the upper left of the picture below.To make clock go faster: turn screw at the very top left clockwise. To make clock go slower: turn screw counterclockwise. The screw  is turned with a screwdriver. Make only a small adjustment each time (about 1/16 of a turn).

 

Hermle Mechanical Pendulum Mantel Clock Instructions

 

Instructions for Hermle Mechanical Mantel Clock with and hour and half hour strike and a pendulum 

note: these clocks usually have Hermle 131 Series Movement

  • Take the clock, pendulum and key carefully out of the carton. Carefully remove the protective packaging such as foam rubber, corrugated paper, rubber bands, etc. You will find these mainly where the hammers, the pendulum leader, gongs or bells are located, inside the back of the clock. Please wind your clock fully every 7 days for optimum performance (the clock will actually run about 8 - 9 days on one winding). To wind the clock use the enclosed key. Turn key clockwise until it stops. The left winder is for the striking and the right winder is for the time. Hang the pendulum onto the pendulum leader as shown in the diagram below. Move the pendulum slightly to the left or right and release it gently. You should hear an even "tic - toc" sound. If the tic-toc is uneven or the clock stops, follow the "putting in beat" instructions that follow next.
  • Putting the clock in beat is an adjustment to make the tic and toc evenly spaced. There is a slip clutch mechanism in the clock's escapement (the part that makes the ticking sound and operates the pendulum). The slip clutch is operated by pushing the pendulum leader (see illustration 1) slightly past the point where you feel a resistance.
  • Putting the clock in beat is the responsibility of the clock owner. While the clock was in beat when it left the factory, it may get out of beat due to handling or not being on a level surface. 
  • To put the clock in beat: Listen to the tic toc. Gently push the pendulum leader slightly past the point of resistance. Listen to the tic toc again. If it is more uneven, push the leader in the opposite direction and listen to the tic tock again. After several tries, you will be able to get the tic and toc sound to be evenly spaced, and the clock is then "in beat".
  • If striking is not required, do not wind up the left winding hole.
  • Move the minute hand (long hand) clockwise or counterclockwise to set the clock to the correct time. The clock will strike the number of each hour, and will strike once on the half-hour.
  • If the clock is striking the wrong hour, move the hour hand (short hand) to point to the hour that the clock just struck. To make the clock run slower - turn the regulating nut below the pendulum to the left .To make the clock run faster - turn the regulating nut to the right. One turn of the regulating nut changes the clock's rate by approximately 1 minute per day. It is normal for the clock to be off 2-5 minutes a week.
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Hermle Mechanical Mantel Clock Instructions (Westminster Chime and Triple Chime)

 

Operating Instructions for Hermle Mantel Clocks with Mechanical 4/4 Westminster Chime W0340 or 4/4 Triple Chime Movement

note: Westminster Chime Clocks have Hermle 340 Series Movement and Hermle Triple Chime Clocks have a 1050 Series Movement

  • Take clock and key carefully out of carton.
  • Open the back door. Remove carefully all packaging material and securing devices such as rubber, foam, paper, etc. Please cut rubber band with a pair of scissors. Open front door and remove the plastic safety bushing (see picture 2). Save the packing in case the clock needs to be returned.
  • Please wind your clock fully every 7 days for optimum performance (the clock will actually run about 8 - 9 days on one winding). To wind the clock use the enclosed key. Turn key clockwise until it stops (about 3 1/2 turns on the left winder and about 4 1/2 turns on center and right winder. The center winder is for the timekeeping, the right winder is for the quarter-hour chime, and the left winder is for the hour strike.
  • If you have a Westminster Chime Clock,  the chime shut-off is located inside the back of the clock case at the right side of the movement (see photo 1)
with a red plastic bushing. Lever up = chime ; Lever down = silent
If you have a Triple Chime Clock, the melody can be selected by the shift lever shown in picture 2. Never move the shift lever while the clock is chiming! The chime is off if you push the shift lever to the silent (top) position.
  • The minute hand (long hand) may be moved clockwise or counterclockwise to set the clock to the correct time. Never turn the hour (short) hand, it moves automatically. After two hours the chimes will be automatically synchronized.
  • To make the clock go slower or faster, turn the regulating screw that is shown in the upper right of picture 3.To make clock go faster: turn screw counterclockwise

Hermle Wall Clocks with Mechanical 4/4 Westminster Chime Instructions

 

  • Take clock, the pendulum and key carefully out of carton.
  • Open door of the clock's case. Carefully remove the protective packaging such as foam rubber, corrugated paper, rubber bands, etc. You will find the material where the hammers are, underneath the movement as well as at the end of the pendulum leader and around the chime rods. Save the packing in case the clock needs to be returned.
  • Hang up the clock so that it is vertical. The safest way to hang the clock is  a wood screw angled upward and screwed into a stud in the wall.
  • Please wind your clock fully every 7 days for optimum performance (the clock will actually run about 8 - 9 days on one winding). To wind the clock use the enclosed key. Turn key clockwise until it stops (about 3 1/2 turns on the left winder and about 4 1/2 turns on center and right winder. The center winder is for the timekeeping, the right winder is for the quarter-hour chime, and the left winder is for the hour strike.
  • Hang the pendulum onto the pendulum leader (see image below)
  • Move the pendulum slightly to the left or right and release it gently. You should hear an even "tic - toc" sound. If the tic-toc is uneven or the clock stops, follow the "putting in beat" procedure.
  • Putting the clock in beat is the responsibility of the clock owner. While the clock was in beat when it left the factory, it may get out of beat during handling. To put the clock in beat: Make sure the clock is hanging straight. Listen to the tic toc. Gently push the pendulum leader slightly past the point of resistance. Listen to the tic toc again. If it is more uneven, push the leader in the opposite direction and listen to the tic tock again. After several tries, you will be able to get the tic and toc sound to be evenly spaced, and the clock is then "in beat".
  • The chime shut-off lever is located to the left of the numeral 9. Turn the lever down if you want the clock to be silent
  • The minute hand (long hand) may be moved clockwise or counterclockwise to set the clock to the correct time. Never turn the hour (short) hand, it moves automatically. After two hours the chimes will be automatically synchronized.
  • If the clock is striking the wrong hour, move the hour hand (short hand) to point to the hour that the clock just struck.
  • To make the clock run slower - turn the regulating nut below the pendulum to the left 
  • To make the clock run faster - turn the regulating nut to the right.
  • One turn of the regulating nut changes the clock's rate by approximately 1 minute per day. It is normal for a clock to run a few minutes fast or slow per week.

Ship's Bell Strike Clock Operating Instructions

 

Ship's bell strike is based on "watches" onboard ship of 4 hours each. A new watch starts at noon, 4 p.m., 8 p.m., midnight, 4 a.m. and 8 a.m. The end of a "watch" and start of a new watch is marked by the bell being struck 8 times. A half hour later, the bell is struck once, with an additional strike each half hour until the end of the watch. Then the cycle starts again. The bells are struck in pairs, that is, the first two bells are struck close together followed by a pause, then the next two, etc. The table below shows the pattern of the bells.

Time Number of
Bells Struck
Pattern of Bells
4:00 8:00 12:00 8 Bells xx xx xx xx
4:30 8:30 12:30 1 Bell x
5:00 9:00 1:00 2 Bells xx
5:30 9:30 1:30 3 Bells xx x
6:00 10:00 2:00 4 Bells xx xx
6:30 10:30 2:30 5 Bells xx xx x
7:00 11:00 3:00 6 Bells xx xx xx
7:30 11:30 3:30 7 Bells xx xx xx x
8:00 12:00 4:00 8 Bells xx xx xx xx

 

Hermle Mechanical Skeleton Mantel Clock with a Pendulum (8 or 14-Day power reserve)

 

 

  • Take the clock, pendulum and key carefully out of the carton.
  • Carefully remove the protective packaging such as foam rubber and rubber bands, to release hammer and pendulum leader.
  • Please wind your clock fully every 7 days for optimum performance (the clock will actually run about 14 days on one winding). To wind the clock hold the pendulum to one side and push key onto the winding square. Turn key clockwise until fully wound (approximately 3 1/2 turns after one week of running).
  • Hang the pendulum onto the pendulum leader, located at the front of the movement (see illustration).
  • Move pendulum gently to left or right side until pendulum leader is touching the hour shaft. Let the pendulum swing so you can hear an even "tick tock" sound.
  • If pendulum should stop, just push it again all the way to the left or right and release it. This may also be necessary after winding up the clock.
  • Move the minute hand (long hand) clockwise or counterclockwise to set the clock to the correct time. The clock will strike the bell once on each hour.
  • The clock is regulated by turning the regulating nut below the pendulum (see illustration below). When turning the nut please hold pendulum disc so that it does not twist.
  • To make the clock run slower - turn the regulating nut to the left.
  • To make the clock run faster - turn the regulating nut to the right.
  • One turn of the regulating nut changes the clock's rate by approximately 2 minutes per day.  
Clock Melodies: Chimes, Strikes and Bells

 

Every clock has its own unique voice. Mantel clocksgrandfather clocks and wall clocks all differ in tone even when the same melody is played. Even within the same family, there may be significant variations. Most of our product pages for chiming clocks showcase the sound of the chimes. We want our customers to have the experience of listening to the sound of the clock. After all, the chime is part of a clock's "personality" and may be an important factor in the buying decision.

Westminster Chimes, also known as the Cambridge Quarters, from its place of origin, the church of St. Mary the Great in Cambridge, England. People commonly associate the Westminster Chimes with Big Ben at the House of Parliament in London.

Whittington Chimes are also called St. Mary's Chimes. There are four variations of this chime sequence. The tune originated with the bell tower of the church of St. Mary le Bow in London, England. In the 14th century, the chimes became famous through a legend that connects them with Dick Whittington. 

St. Michael Chimes originated in the United States. The bells for this chime were originally cast in London for installation in St. Michael’s Church in Charleston, South Carolina.

Ave Maria Chimes are based on Franz Schubert's Ave Maria, which was inspired by the Sir Walter Scott poem "The Lady of the Lake." The composition came into usage as clock chimes in the 1940s.

Bim-Bam is a descriptive term for the two-note chimes which sound only at the half hour and hour. With most clocks, mechanically-driven hammers strike the two tuned chime rods to produce the distinctive tone.

Gong sounds the hours on a bell or gong. In 12-hour striking, used most commonly in striking clocks today, the clock strikes once at 1:00 A.M., twice at 2:00 A.M., continuing in this way up to twelve times at 12:00 P.M., then starts again, striking once at 1:00 P.M., twice at 2:00 P.M., up to twelve times at 12:00 A.M.

Cuckoo Clock entertains everyone with its unmistakable cuckoo call, said to bring luck. Traditionally, with cuckoo clocks, a gong is struck by a mechanical hammer. This adds depth of sound to the cuckoo call. If the hammer is too close to the gong, then the clock might produce a sick-sounding cuckoo.

Most clocks that have a chiming movement, (three winding holes) typically come with the Westminster Chime. However, some clocks have multiple tunes that are selectable.  The most common combination on triple-chime clocks is Westminster, St. Michael's, and Whittington. There are variations of each chime so different clocks may play them differently. 

Ship Bell Strikes are different from the other clock melodies. Unlike civil clock bells, the strikes of a ship's bell do not accord to the number of the hour. Instead, there are eight bells, one for each half-hour of a four-hour watch. In the age of sailing, watches were timed with a 30-minute hourglass. Bells would be struck every time the glass was turned, and in a pattern of pairs for easier counting, with any odd bells at the end of the sequence.

 

Here we've gathered a sampling of sounds in one place to make it easy for people to compare and contrast. While these sounds provide a good sense for the different chime melodies, please keep in mind that the clock you end up getting may have a slightly different tone than the one you hear here